Pharma Cash Cow: Old Medications, Lucrative Opportunities

In August of this year, the rights to the decades old drug Daraprim were purchased by pharmaceutical company Turing Pharmaceuticals.  Daraprim is the standard of care for treating toxoplasmosis and is used as well in treating HIV infections, cancers, and malaria.  Although the drug was previously sold at $13.50 per tablet, upon its purchase by Turing Pharmaceuticals, the drug’s price increased by over 5,000% to $750.00 per tablet, sparking mass outrage across the internet.

The CEO of Turner Pharmaceuticals, Martin Shkreli, a former hedge fund manager, responded to the widespread criticism of the price increase by providing several reasons for the pricing structure change.  In particular, Mr. Shkreli cited the need to keep the company’s manufacturing costs competitive and to raise capital for the development of new medications to treat toxoplasmosis.  However, medical professionals indicate that there is no need to develop new pharmaceuticals to treat toxoplasmosis and that the former price was profitable, albeit at a much smaller margin.

In response to the public outcry against the price hike, which included criticisms from former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and presidential candidate and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, Turing Pharmaceuticals has reversed the price increase. However, Turing Pharmaceuticals is not the only pharmaceutical company to acquire an old medication and subsequently increase its price to boost profits.  Other drugs, such as Sovaldi, used to treat hepatitis C; Harvoni, a follow-on formulation of Sovaldi for hepatitis C; Retrophin, used to reduce kidney stones; and Cycloserine, used to treat drug-resistant tuberculosis, have also been subjected to similar price increases. Congress is poised to inspect the recent trend in drug price increases, but until congressional action is taken, it appears public outcry will be the primary means of keeping more excessive increases at bay.

To read more about, this click on any of the following links:  LA Times, NBC, NBC News, CBS News

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